Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 33
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0051
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/adams1895/0051
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen
facsimile
I.] The Empyrean Gate. 33

of the " Gods in the House of Glory;" the
joyous song of the holy departed who stand
victorious before the judgment seat, echoed
triumphantly by the inner chorus of their
beloved who have gone before them into the
fulness of light. Above is the "Empyrean
Gate" ("the opening of Athor," as the Ritual
calls it), which leads to the " Secret Places
of Heaven;" the ascending spaces above the
King's chamber, once completely closed, and
constituting the innermost, the loftiest, and
the most secret of the Hidden Places. And
the whole is dominated and crowned by a
gigantic triangle of granite, masonically ex-
pressing the divine Trinity of Egypt.

Such is the complex and hitherto unex-
plained system of gateways and passages.
shafts, channels, and chambers; some leading
upwards, some downwards, some level; some
rough in the last degree, others exquisitely
polished ; some magnificent in their propor-
tions, some so low that a man must creep,

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