Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 34
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0052
Zitierlink: i
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen
34 The Pyramid of Light. [Ch.

so narrow that he can with difficulty pass,
to be found within the Pyramid of Light.
It is absolutely unique; no other building,
it may be safely averred (not even the later
Pyramids), having contained any structure
bearing the least resemblance to the higher
chambers. Striking as it is in every feature,
the most remarkable circumstance of all is the
evident intention of the architect to preserve
that secrecy which lends a majesty to the
strange theosophy of Egypt. What then was
the design, the secret and jealously guarded
design, with which this wondrous edifice was
constructed ? That its various features are
meaningless, or the mere result of caprice, is
a suo-o-estion to which the forethought and
lavishness of calculation displayed in every
detail unmistakably give the lie. Nor again
can we maintain that they are necessary for
the purposes of an ordinary tomb. For, in
the first place, they are not to be found in the
other Pyramids, which were used for that
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