Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 83
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0101
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/adams1895/0101
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen
facsimile
III.] Knowledge of Divine Unity. 83

full strength of choir and congregation. That
is the word by which the apostle denotes the
absolute nature of the Deity as compared with
created matter. " In Him all things are
Amen." That is the title with which the seer
of the apocalypse invokes the advent of his
Divine Master at the conclusion of the vision :
"Amen, Veni Domine Jesu." That is the
title which the Master assumed to Himself,
"Amen, I say to you." And that is the title
by which the Egyptian priests of old addressed
the secret Deity—Amen, that is to say, in
Egyptian, " The Hidden One."

That the existence of the one God was widely
known by some classes of men at least among
the nations of antiquity there can be little
doubt. Among the Chinese, according to the
ttiost eminent authority, Dr. Legge, the word Ti
represented the same idea as we express by the
word God ; and its assumption as a title by the
earliest dynasty of the Emperors of China would
be quite in accordance with the ancient belief
loading ...