Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 86
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0104
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/adams1895/0104
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86 The Hidden God. [Ch.

that all men are the offspring of God, and
that consequently the right of prayer to Him
is universal—

" 0 thou most glorious and immortal One,
0 many-titled, 0 Omnipotent,
Zeus, Lord of Nature, ruling all by Law,
Hail! whom to worship is the right of all;
Since all of us are of Thee."

Even the Eoman mind, dim-eyed as it was
for the invisible world, was not altogether
without a glimpse of this truth, to which
Horace has given expression when speaking
of the supreme deity—

" From whom none greater than himself is born ;
Nor doth his equal, or his second, live."

But the truths which sparkle here and there
in the teachings of India, China, or of Greece,
fade and vanish before the blaze of Egyptian
theosophy. Take, for example, the following
extract given by Mr. Budge from the hymn
to Amen-Ba, the hidden deity, the Self-
Existent Light: "Hail to thee, Ba, Lord of
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