Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 107
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0125
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/adams1895/0125
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III.] The Supreme Mystery. 107

know these things ; who so learned as to make
them clear ?

Most powerful and most hidden of all is the
passion which grows the more reticent in
proportion as it is more enduring, the passion
which dominates at once the senses and the
.spirit; the master-mystery of Love. But
Love himself was none other than the hidden
God. In Greece, where some rays of Egyptian
wisdom penetrated with a brightness denied
to more distant lands, this truth was not
unknown. Love was the third in the Trinity
of Hesiod. And in Parmenides we read how
" strife has entered into the deepest places ; but
in the centre Love stands calm." But in the
teaching of Egypt, the Creator's love so con-
spicuous in the sublime hymn already quoted,
is the motive power of the universe, the
secret energy of the Light. " I am the
Inundation," says the Creator in the Ritual—
the fulness of the Torrent of Life. And
again, "] am the Fount of Joy," the
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