Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 227
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0245
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/adams1895/0245
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vii.] The Lintel of Justice. 227

mysterious gateway, the secret of whose
masonry still remains undisclosed, refuses
entrance to the upward path except to the
adept. " ' I will not let thee go over me,' "
says the sill, " ' unless you tell me my name.'
' The weight in the right place is thy name,' "
is the profound reply of the adept. For, as
the raising of the portcullis depends upon the
true adjustment of the weight, so also is
justice the virtue without which the path on
high remains for ever closed. " ' I will not let
thee pass me,' " says the Left Lintel —■ so
continues this strange dialogue—" ' unless you
tell me my name.' ' Return of the true is thy
name.' ' I will not let thee pass me,' " says the
Right Lintel, " ' unless you tell me my name.'
' Return of judged hearts is thy name.' " For
without truth, and without self-judgment, no
step can lie taken of progress in the Path of
Truth (cxxv.). With that doctrine we may
compare the " Golden Words " of Pythagoras,
himself a pupil of the priests of Egypt —
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