Adams, Walter M.  
The house of the hidden places: a clue to the creed of early Egypt from Egyptian sources — London, 1895

Seite: 228
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.4668#0246
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/adams1895/0246
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen
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228 The Illumination of the Adept. [Ch.

" Do innocence ; take heed before thou act;
Nor let soft sleep upon thy eyelids fall,
E'er the day's actions thou hast three times scanned,
"What have I done, where erred, what left unwrought ?
Go through the whole account, and if the sum
Be evil, chide thee ; but if good, rejoice.
This do, this meditate, this ever love,
And it shall guide thee into virtue's path."

But to him who has learned of wisdom,
however long, however arduous the search, the
entrance into Truth cannot finally be denied.
The Hidden Lintel is crossed ; and the memory
of that passage is for ever kept sacred by the
grateful departed. " I have come through the
Hidden Lintel," he cries triumphantly, later
on, " I have come like the sun through the
gate of the festival." The lintel crossed, the
Person of the Divine Teacher is disclosed,
having before him the true Balance of Light
and Darkness (cxxv.). The " secret faces at the
gate " unveil themselves ; and the adept stands
within the Double Hall of Truth—of Truth in
Death and Truth in Life, of Truth in Justice
and Truth in Mercy, of Truth in Darkness and
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