Aldrich, Henry; Smyth, Philip [Übers.]
The Elements Of Civil Architecture: According To Vitruvius And Other Ancients, And The Most Approved Practice Of Modern Authors, Especially Palladio — London, 1789 [Cicognara Nr. 395]

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20 . O F THE ELEMENTS OF

BOOK, I. CHAP. V.

PLATE XL

O F THE TWO KINDS.

§. i. f | ''HE Romans have added to the three Grecian
JL Orders two, which we call Kinds, taken from the
Greeks (as in mod things the Romans were their imitators).

The first Kind is Etruscan, or Tuscan, which also may be
called Rustic; it differs from the Doric as much as the ap-
pearance of an inhabitant of the country does from one of a
city. There is extant no antient specimen of it with an en-
tablature. Vitruvius speaks of it as rustic even to deformity ;
nor are modern artists more favourable to it, except Palladio.

The. height of the pedestal is 2 : oo', the face ssat. The
pillar is 14 : 00' high ; the shaffe plain. The intercolumnia-
tions araeostyle. The height of the entablature is a fourth part
of the column.

PLATE XII, XIII, XIV.

§. 2. The second Kind is Composite, which is threefold: r.
The Italian (which is called Composite by way of eminence)
is, I think, never mentioned by Vitruvius. It is composed
both of the Ionic and Corinthian ; which two exhibit more
graces in combination, than either of them would if joined
singly with the Doric. The Composite is more {lender than
the Corinthian, and more ornamented with sculpture : if the
latter bears any resemblance to a young maid, the former re-
presents an harlot.

The height of the pedestal is a third part of the column ;
6 : 20; for the height of the column is 20 : 00. The shaft
admits of ssutings. The intercolumniations are pycnostyle.
The height of the entablature is a fifth part of the column;
its base is attic, or rather lonico-Corinthian. The bell of
the capital, like that of the Corinthian, is enleaved, with a

capital
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