Aldrich, Henry; Smyth, Philip [Übers.]
The Elements Of Civil Architecture: According To Vitruvius And Other Ancients, And The Most Approved Practice Of Modern Authors, Especially Palladio — London, 1789 [Cicognara Nr. 395]

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Temple of Diana, but that the Doric was less adapted to that
edifice ; and in the Temple of Venus even the Ionic had been
improperly placed. Cariatic columns in any Temple would
have been ridiculous; as it would have been introducino; mo-
numents of vengeance into an asylum of mercy. The carved
work of the Doric Order in the Baths of Dioclesian, is cen-
sured; if it be not admitted to be excessive, it cannot be thought
to be manly. 1 he same fault is to be found in Scamozzi’s
rule sor the Doric column, particularly with respebl to the
ssutings in the shaft.

But to preserve fitness, a general rule is set aside with suc»
cess ; for instance, in the Ionic capital the faces of the volutes
are generally made opposite each other : but with great judg-
ment the artiil has made them contiguous, in the angular co-
lumns of the Temple of Fortuna Virilis ; so that the same
column very properly and happily corresponds with both Or-
ders. In the Corinthian capital, instead of volutes and helices,
figures representing the horse Pegasus were substituted, even
in the Augustan age ; but they were substituted in the Tem-
ple of Mars Ultor : instead of the flower of the abacus was
seen an eagle grasping thunder, but it was in the portico os
the Emperor Severus, For the same reason, i. e0 fitness, there
are Composite columns in the Temple of Concord. But in-
ventions of this kind should be attempted seldom and with
caution, as in no other department of the art is success so
precarious.

§. 7. VL The rules observed by the antients carry an au-
thority with them which may not be disputed. In compliance
with which we must not mix the Italian kinds of Architec-
ture with the Grecian Orders, nor the Composite with the
T uscan ; nor should the Tuscan Order be introduced in edi-
fices in a city, except in the case of an insulated column.
We at present negledt these circumstances, and yet preserve
seme practices that seem more repugnant to the principles of

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