Aldrich, Henry; Smyth, Philip [Übers.]
The Elements Of Civil Architecture: According To Vitruvius And Other Ancients, And The Most Approved Practice Of Modern Authors, Especially Palladio — London, 1789 [Cicognara Nr. 395]

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ments, and open within, but are of such sigure and propor-,
tions as do not properly fall under the description os atria
or peristylia ; such as for the most part are the quadran-
gles os colleges in the Universities.


§„ y. We will now, with Palladio as our guide, form the
proportions of the Tuscan caVjEdia. Immediately from the
velfibule we proceed to the atrium, whose length is to its
breadth as three to two, and whose breadth is to the side of
the tablinum as sive to two. From the tablinum we enter
the peristylium, -which is longer across by a third part than
its depth, and its porticos should be as wide as the columns
are high. The ether parts may be made as in plate 35, or
varied according to the pleasure of the Architect, provided he
adheres to the general rules.

The tetrastyle CAViEDiA may be thus construdled,
agreeable to the same writer. Through the vestibule we pro-
ceed to the atrium, whose length is to its breadth as five to
three; the half of its breadth gives the side of the tablinum,
the third of it the aperture of the impluvium, The eighth
part gives the breadth of the wing; and the sixteenth part
forms the diameter os the four columns, which are likewise
of the Corinthian order. The peristylium is a third part
longer crostways than in depth. It has two orders of columns;
those below are Doric 16 feet high ; the breadth of the por-
ticos is the same. The columns above are Ionic, a fourth
part more {lender than the Doric ; they rest on a base or pe-
destal entire two feet and three quarters high.

Of the testudinated and Corinthian atrios we
{hall treat more properly hereaster. Os the displuviateDj,
with Palladio, we shal! say nothing.

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