Aldrich, Henry; Smyth, Philip [Übers.]
The Elements Of Civil Architecture: According To Vitruvius And Other Ancients, And The Most Approved Practice Of Modern Authors, Especially Palladio — London, 1789 [Cicognara Nr. 395]

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54

OF THE ELEMENTS OP

BOOK H. CHAP. III.

OF THE PRIVATE CITY HOUSES OF OTHER NATIONS;

§. i. yTANY nations, as they differ in climate and
X Y jL manners, vary likewise in their modes of build-
ing. It will be of singular advantage to the architect: to be
well acquainted with their particular plans, and diligently to
study the antient models, more especially those of the Greek
and Roman artists. We proceed therefore to treat os these ;
and as the designs of Mons. Perrault generally explain Vi-
truvius, and Palladio supplies the defedfs of M. Perrault, we
will lay before the reader the plans of both, and mark the
places described by each of them with the same letters.

PLATE XLI, XLII.

§. 2. A city house among the Greeks has no vestibule op-
posite the street Z, and no court in the entrance, but a nar-
row passage A, called in Greek Sv^ugeiov or gateway, on one
side of which are the ftables B, and on the other the porter’s
lodges C.

From thence you enter the peristylium, but improperly
so called, as it has porticos only on three sides D, and in
that part which faces the south there are two ante, one on
each side, forming an aperture to the space E retiring inward,
which was called -sr^orccg and zrotfctg. These ante * are se-
parated by a considerable distance, being one and an half of
the side of the building which runs back, on these piers the
beams os the adjoining stories rest. On the right hand and
left of these are three apartments on each side; two of a mode-
rate size H H called the thalamus and antithalamus 5 to

* The three words antae, prostas and pastas mean the same things, viz. square
columns or piers ; on each side an entrance or door way. The Reader by refer-
ring to the note on B. iii, Ch. i. of Vitruvius, may inform himself of the va-
rious opinions concerning these terms.

each
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