Andersen, Hendrick Christian [Hrsg.]; Hébrard, Ernest M.   [Hrsg.]
Creation of a world centre of communication — Paris, 1913

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Beyond the navigable canal, are the industrial quarters, and towards
the open country, stretch the garden-suburbs. Each of these is provided
with its own schools, markets, libraries, churches, theatres, recreation
grounds, and the necessary administrative buildings. The dwellings are
placed in the midst of greenery and stand singly or in groups, in such
manner that light and air may penetrate profusely. Reached by the navi-
gable canal as well as by underground rail, these garden-suburbs thus
enable workingmen and women to enjoy pleasant and healthful conditions,
while being within easy range of both city and industrial quarters.
They are, moreover, so placed that they can be indefinitely extended.
Indeed, the whole city, by the formation of new nuclei in direct communi-
cation with the centre, may spread to whatever extent is found desirable.
Adjoining the suburbs are upon one side, vast grounds for aviation, upon
the other, open spaces for exhibitions.

Thus, radiating from the Tower of Progress, the several parts of the
city permit of free circulation from one to another, and provide the resi-
dents of each quarter with the chief necessities conducive to health and to
the enjoyment of life. Centralising the public services, they offer to all
alike the needed opportunities for intellectual and physical development and
recreation. At the same time, kept broadly within these lines, each can
have its own individuality as strongly marked as may be desired by the
will of the people. Rising in their midst, seen from afar, and forming the
central point of view from all the long avenues that radiate from it through
the city into the open country, the Tower of Progress, 720 metres in
height, forms the commemorative " Signal " symbolising the onward pro-
gress of humanity.
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