Angell, Samuel
Sculptured metopes discovered amongst the ruins of the ancient city of Selinus in Sicily by William Harris and Samuel Angell in the year 1823 — London, 1826

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http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/angeli1826/0058
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facsimile
attitudes of the figures are simple ; the bodies are dispropor-
tionably short, and the waists much contracted ; the heads and
upper part of the bodies are shewn as viewed in front, while the
legs and feet are generally shewn in profile. The eyes are large
and fixed, and there is a peculiar expression in the mouths; the
hair is long and plaited, falling down in front over the shoul-
ders ; the execution of il is extremely formal, nearly approach-
ing to the manner in which it is represented on many of the
Egyptian statues.

With regard to the date of these antiquities, it is presumed
that there can be but little doubt that the six temples described
in this work were all erected previous to the destruction of the
city in the third year of the ninety-second Olympiad ; the early
style of the architecture in general, more particularly the pro-
portion of the columns, varying from four and a half to five
and a quarter diameters in height, the decidedly ancient charac-
ter of the sculptures, and the grandeur of the works, inconsist-
ent with the state of weakness and comparative insignificance
to wliich the city was reduced, and in which it afterwards re-

care and nicely, whence the ligures njmii them afford tin- best possible additional illustra-
tion. From those it appears that much of the dryness and hardness before observed in the
more ancient medal- of I'o-idouia was still retained, though in a loser derive : the muscles
of the body being still marked inure strongly than ever they c\ist in nature, though with
great accuracy as to form and disposition. The general proportions of the figures arc
long, being as much its seven anil a half heads, and, as in the more ancient style, the sto-
mach and belly ate much contracted, while the breast and haunches are remarkably large
and full. The attitude is just approaching to grace, the weight of the body being raised
upon one leg, but with both feet pointed straight Ibrwards, without any of that elegant
character of easy dignity which distinguishes the figures of the same personages on the late
coins of this city."
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