Egypt Exploration Fund   [Hrsg.]
Archaeological report: comprising the work of the Egypt Exploration Fund and the progress of egyptology during the year ... — 1894-1895

Seite: 33
DOI Artikel: 10.11588/diglit.10057.2
DOI Artikel: 10.11588/diglit.10057.3
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.10057#0045
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/archaeological_report1894_1895/0045
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen
facsimile
Excavations at Deib el Bahari dueing the Winter, 1891-95. 33

these cemeteries is immense, and no excavation is likely to be of tlie
slightest value, unless it is carried out to the end, i.e. to the level of
virgin rock, or water. Even then, as has been shown, the chance of
finding objects that will repay the time and expense of working, is small
in any individual hole; though that such objects exist is well within the
bounds of probability.

The plans which accompany this note were made by Mr. E. R. Bevau,
with whom I worked in conjunction,

E. 'F. Benson,

B.—THE EXCAVATIONS AT DEIR EL BAHARI
DURING THE WINTER, 1894-95.

(See Plates I. and II. and Plan.)

The clearing of the temple at Deir el Bahari is practically finished.
This great work has extended over nearly three winters, and has
occupied 215 working days. The temple of Hatshepsu now presents a
striking sight to the traveller approaching from Goornah along the old
central avenue, or on the flank from the Ramesseum. The proto-Doric
columns give one the impression of a Greek temple ; and the white
limestone of which they are made, though by no means to be compared
to white marble, contributes to that illusion.

The first work we attempted, when we settled there at the end of
November, was the completion of the clearing of the middle platform.
On the north side we had dug down to the floor only along the colonnade.
Now, all the mounds which remained on the platform have disappeared.
We found there some Coptic burials,1 and also a few coffins of the
XXVlth Dynasty. One of them, belonging to a woman, is very fine.
I believe that the inner cores of these mounds, which consisted merely
of chips of rock, are the debris produced by the levelling of the floor
and the dressing of the rock behind the colonnade. When the
construction of the temple was interrupted, the workmen did not take
the trouble to carry the chips away.

On the southern side of the platform, in front of the Punt terrace,
stood a small mound, which looked like a heap of rubbish coming from

1 See pi. II.

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