Egypt Exploration Fund   [Hrsg.]
Archaeological report: comprising the work of the Egypt Exploration Fund and the progress of egyptology during the year ... — 1900-1901

Seite: 8
DOI Artikel: 10.11588/diglit.12583.6
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.12583#0022
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/archaeological_report1900_1901/0022
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen
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II.-PROGKRESS OF EGYPTOLOGY.

A.—ARCHAEOLOGY, HIEROGLYPHIC STUDIES, ETC.

The past year has again been productive of valuable work and dis-
coveries. Happily tbere are no startling disasters to the monuments to
be chronicled, and M. Maspero is taking vigorous measures to secure
the safety of the ancient buildings for the future by timely repairs.
Plundering of the antiquities has been to some extent repressed, while
Dr. Reisner, as chief of the expedition of the University of California,
has added another record of success to the brief list of excavations
conducted on scientific lines in Egypt. The first volumes of the full
Catalogue of the Cairo collection have been published, much to the
satisfaction of all interested in the greatest museum of Egyptology in
the world. This year also the French Archaeological Institute in Cairo
has founded a new journal, covering the whole range of Egyptian history
and archaeology down to recent times. Elsewhere, perhaps the most
important event of the year is Mr. Petrie's brilliant endeavour in Diosjjolis
Parva to co-ordinate the results of excavations amongst the prehistoric
cemeteries of Egypt; his second campaign at Abydos is likewise notable
as consolidating the results previously obtained for the earliest historic
period. Mr. Evans' unexpected discovery of the cartouche of a Hyksos
king at Cnossus, in Crete, has furnished a new and most valuable
chronological link between Egypt and the early civilization of the
Mediterranean.

Since M. Maspero's arrival much time and money has been spent under
the head of preservation of the monuments. At Karnak M. Legrain has
employed a long season chiefly in removing the drums of the fallen
columns and the architraves, and clearing the ground for the foundations
on which they are afterwards to be rebuilt. The work of strengthening
and consolidating dangerous places in the walls has also been continued.
In the Annates du Serv. i. 121, is Legkain's report—with two photo-
loading ...