Egypt Exploration Fund   [Hrsg.]
Archaeological report: comprising the work of the Egypt Exploration Fund and the progress of egyptology during the year ... — 1903-1904

Seite: 75
DOI Artikel: 10.11588/diglit.12053.8
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.12053#0091
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/archaeological_report1903_1904/0091
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Christian Egypt.

75

Ar., Syr.), and incidentally gives curious information as to the custom of
translating in church the lections from Coptic into Arabic. The editor
lays stress upon the value of the variants here collected and of this MS.
as a basis for any future study of the Arabic Gospel versions.

2. Apocrypha, Gnostidsvi fyc. E. Andeksson, continuing his transla-
tions of the Bohairic " Testaments'' printed by Guidi (v. last Report, 56),
has given us that of the patriarch Isaac.7

Reyillout has announced in several places8 his discovery of a Coptic
Gospel of Hie Twelve Apostles, and has already given two analyses of the
work, with partial translations of it and of other apocryphal fragments
which he is about to print in the Patrulngia Orientalis of MM. Graffin and
Nau. The texts appear to be certain familiar fragments from the Borgian
collection, some (unpublished) in Paris, and the Strassburg papyrus,
admitted b)T Harnack to be probably from this gospel. The author of the
work R. recognizes as the Pseudo-Gamaliel, and he declares that it will
in future be impossible to study the criticism and exegesis of the New
Testament without having regard to it. Yet it is difficult to understand
upon what principles R.'s text can be constructed, seeing, on the one hand,
that it has been put together from fragments of wholly disconnected MSS.,
and, on the other, that we have no Greek text of this gospel surviving,
which might be taken as a guide.

Before, however, Revillout's edition has appeared, a number of the
same texts—those in Paris—have been edited and translated with minute
exactitude by P. Lacau,9 who was unaware of R.'s intentions. Parts of
five MSS. have been brought together, all referring to the ministry or the
passion and resurrection of Christ. No. i is related to the known Acta
Piloti; no. ii may be from an apocryphal gospel, and treats of Pilate at
the tomb; no. iii is perhaps from the gospel of Bartholomew; no. iv, the
apocalypse of Bartholomew, is from the MS. to which Dulaurier's fragment
belonged; no. v, a gospel treating of Christ's ministry and of Peter's
bishopric. Excellent photographs reproduce all the MSS.

CONRADY, whose views as to the value of the Protevangelium did not
meet with general acceptance, has now examined the sources for the story
of the flight into Egypt.10 The short accounts to be found in the
apocryphal gospels of Matthew and Thomas point to earlier, forgotten
sources, as do the Arabic legends. These, he suggests, are to be sought in
a lost termination of the Protevangelium. He is inclined to attribute
certain features of the story to pagan myths of Egypt. It may be
mentioned that the present writer is preparing an edition of the Arabic
homilies of Cyriacus of Behnesa on this theme.
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