Rudiments of ancient architecture, containing an historical account of the five orders, with their proportions, and examples of each from antiques also, extracts from Vitruvius, Pliny, &c. relative to the buildings of the ancients — London, 1810 (4. Aufl.)

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the triglyph; these decorations charac-
terize the Doric order, and in part are
inseparable from it. Its proportions re-
commend it where united strength and
grandeur are wanted.

The Ionic partakes of more delicacy
than either of the former, and therefore,
as well as on account of its origin, is called
Feminine, and not improperly compared to
a matron-like appearance ; it is a medium
between the masculine Doric, and the
virginal slenderness of the Corinthian :—
the boldness of the voluted capital, with
the beauty of the shaft, makes it eligible
for porticoes, frontispieces entrances to
houses, &c. Denteles were first added to
the cornice of this order.

The Corinthian possesses more delicacy
and ornament than any other order ; the
beauty and richness of the foliaged capital,
with the delicacy of the pillar, render it
very properly adapted, when magnificent
elegance is required: it is frequently
used for internal decoration to large or
state rooms ; the appearance is of vir-
ginal delicacy, and gay attire ; modillions
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