Rudiments of ancient architecture, containing an historical account of the five orders, with their proportions, and examples of each from antiques also, extracts from Vitruvius, Pliny, &c. relative to the buildings of the ancients — London, 1810 (4. Aufl.)

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ANCIENT ARCHITECTURE. 73

OF THE DISPOSITION OF THE HOUSES
OF THE GREEKS.

We shall here follow the account given by
Vitruvius.—" The Greeks use no atrium,
but from the gate of entrance they make
a passage of no great breadth; on one side
of which is the stable, on the other the
porters' rooms, and these are directly ter-
minated by the inner gate : passing on, is
the peristylium, having porticos on three
sides ; on the south side, are two antse,
which support and form a passage, within
which (i. e. to the right and left) are the
great oeci, in which the mistress of the fa-
mily, and the workwomen reside. To the
right and left, are cubiculij or chambers,
of which one is called Thalamus, the other,
Amphithalamus ; and under the porticos of
the peristyle are the common dining rooms,
chambers, and family rooms. This part of
the edifice is called Gynceconitis.

Through the passage with the antge, is
a large house, having a more spacious pe-
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