Rudiments of ancient architecture, containing an historical account of the five orders, with their proportions, and examples of each from antiques also, extracts from Vitruvius, Pliny, &c. relative to the buildings of the ancients — London, 1810 (4. Aufl.)

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ANCIENT ARCHITECTURE. 75

when strangers arrive, they may not enter
the peristylium, but be received in this
hospitalium; for when the Greeks were
more refined and opulent, they prepared
triclinia, cubicula, and provisions for
strangers : the first day inviting them to
dinner, afterwards sending them poultry,
eggs, herbs, fruits, and other productions
of the country. Masters of families,
therefore, when they abode in the hospi-
tium seemed not to be from home, enjoy-
ing the full liberty of retirement, in these
apartments.

Vitruv. Lib. 6. cap. 10,

OP THE CITY HOUSES OF THE ROMANS,

Respecting the houses of the Romans,
I know of no better guide than Vitruvius,
who, after describing such as are proper
for merchants, bankers, &c, observes,
" Those of the nobles, who bear the ho-*
nours of magistracy and decide the affairs
of the citizens, should have a princely
vestibule, lofty atrium, (hall), and ample
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