Rudiments of ancient architecture, containing an historical account of the five orders, with their proportions, and examples of each from antiques also, extracts from Vitruvius, Pliny, &c. relative to the buildings of the ancients — London, 1810 (4. Aufl.)

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84 RUDIMENTS OF

The garden abounds with fig and mulberry
trees, to which the soil is suitable, but not
to other trees. The prospect here, not less
pleasant than that of the sea, is enjoyed
from a ccenatio, rather distant from the
sea ; on the back it is encompassed with
two diatce, whose windows look to the ves-
tibule of the Villa, and to a fruitful
kitchen garden.

Hence, a crypto-porticus, (a long in-
closed room, or portico) extends, for size,
comparable to a public building, with
windows on both sides ; those next the
sea, the most numerous, on the garden
side they are single, with fewer in the
upper row. These, when the day is se-
rene and calm, are all opened, but when
the wind is troublesome, those on the op-
posite side are opened without any incon-
venience. Before the crypto-porticus, is a
xystus, (a spacious place for exercise, or a
terras) fragrant with violets, in which the
heat of the sun is increased by the reflec-
tion of the crypto-porticus, which at the
same time, keeps off the north-east wind;
wherefore it is hot in the front, and cool
in the rear; it also skreens from the south-
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