Papers of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens — 5.1886-1890

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ARCHITECTURAL REMAINS IN IK ARIA.

65

Abutting on the Pythion in the rear is the structure G, possibly intended
for the priests. Of its wall a b the substructure is complete; of ac only
scattered blocks of the substructure remain; of ay we have both sub-
structure and some of the upper wall : ay was not built into xz, but
terminated against it, yz forming a common party-wall for the two
buildings.

J is a large base or platform made up of at least t wenty marble slabs,
of which fifteen are still in place. Here may have been the great altar
of the deme-ccntre.20

At K there are two massive marble seats, one a double seat (arms
broken) finished smooth on the right-hand side, and on the other side
finished smooth only on the edges, evidently intended to fit to another
seat. The other seat is single, and is so worked as to show that it was

Fig. 8.— One of the double s«i(s.

fitted to others on both sides. The back of this seat is quite gone.
The heavy slabs upon which the seats rest are in situ, although they
have been much canted, and they show that the seats are in their
original position. Another double seat, which was found near the
church during the first week of the excavations, and is the best pre-
served, is shown in Fig. 8 (see plate v). It has precisely the same
measurements as the double seat at K, and is w orked smooth on the
left-hand side only. It is thus plain that this seat was carried from
K, where it originally belonged, so that the series of five seats was

20 [The axis of the threshold of the Pythion and of its altar or statue-hase appears
to intersect the centre of this platform. If we take the platform as the site of the
chief altar, the unusual and unsymmetrical placing of the doorway of the Pythion
may find a possihle explanation in the desire to leave the line of vision unobstructed
from the statue of Apollo to the great altar of the deme.—T. W. L.]
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