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Studio: international art — 1.1893

Seite: 66
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: 
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1893/0084
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
0.5
1 cm
facsimile
Drawing for Reftrodtictioft

ail*.',**

v5 ^rojj^pf-

Railton. By the courtesy of Messrs. Isbister
& Co., the publishers, I am here able to repro-
duce two which appeared in the Dean of Glouces-
ter's " Dreamland in History," a delightfully illus-
trated book, containing many admirable examples
of Mr. Railton's work.

The texture is simple, the lines crossed under
good angles, fresh and effective, good to reproduce
and good to print.

II. From the Typographic Etching Co.

It will be well at starting to explain why, and to
what extent, any kind of special drawing is necessary
to obtain a good result by photo-reproduction.
The first reason is the varying actinism—or pho-
tographic value—of different colours ; or, to put it
simply, that the colour of the ink and the character
of the paper used for the drawing affect to the last
degree the excellence of the negative that can be
obtained. The second, that the quality of ink and < ,(

paper used, and the skill and care exercised, in the - ^ j?Ss«dlL_iflL-

printing, decide the limit to which the work can -*J ^v*^^--****™*^^,^

be carried in subtlety and delicacy of effect; and
thus any elaboration or refinement of the drawing
beyond this limit is waste labour only. How far
any special drawing is required depends upon the
taste of the critic. If any block which faithfully
renders the artistic meaning of the drawing is
acceptable, then any drawing no matter how com-
plicated, can be reproduced-—at any rate by the
special gelatine relief process. But if, as is often and uniform the original must be in every dot and
the case, the artist require individual lines and line.

dots specifically reproduced, then clear, black, For the gelatine process, it matters not whether

a drawing be in pen,
pencil or crayon, as
all these possess a
texture or grain suf-
ficient to give a good
and clear printing
surface when devel-
oped. Pen draw-
ings supply in their
own solid lines or
dots the best of
printing textures;
pencil and crayon,
when analysed, will
be found to consist
of minute solid dots
with the white paper
for interstices, and
thus yield an excel-
-g^u' lent printing stipple.

FROM A DRAWING BY CUTHBERT RIGBY. REPRODUCED BY THE TYPO-ETCHING CO. The Superposition

66

FROM A DRAWING BY HERBERT RAILTON. REPRODUCED
BY L. CHEFDEVILLE

(By permission of Messrs. Isbister &• Co.)
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