Hinweis: Ihre bisherige Sitzung ist abgelaufen. Sie arbeiten in einer neuen Sitzung weiter.

Studio: international art — 11.1897

Seite: 100
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1897b/0117
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
facsimile
George Chester

deemed suitable for posters j hut the subject is too In another chapter the work of Mr. Herbert
big to treat in the final sentence of a chapter. We McNair, Mr. Talwin Morris, and Mrs. Francis
yet await permanent decorations from the hands of Newbury will be fully illustrated, and later on we
Messrs. Pryde and Nicholson (the Beggarstaff hope to represent the work of Mr. George Walton,
Brothers), from Mr. Maurice Greiffenhagen, from and of Mr. Oscar Paterson no less fully. So
Mr. Aubrey Beardsley, and dozens of the younger with an ample selection of the achievements of
men who have exploited flat-colours in simplified young Glasgow, people at a distance will be able to
masses ; yet that there is every reason to hope for form some idea of its aims. Even to a person who
a new spirit in mural decoration these illustrations lacks sympathy with certain aspects of its work, it
of Mr. Mackintosh's work surely prove in part. As would appear that the movement there is worth study
we shall see later by Mr. Walton's work, which is and worth out-spoken approval, for one has but to
less influenced by the poster than by the mural call to mind the platitudes in the flat which
decorations it has obeyed, it is not the personal adorn (?) the walls of most of our public build-
expression of any one artist which is here com- ings to feel grateful for any consistent effort to
mended, but the systematic conventionalisation of produce something at once novel and, in its own
form, the use of bright colours, and the absence of way, beautiful,
hackneyed motives which mark the experiment.

E O R G E
CHESTER:
THE LAST
OF THE
OLD
LANDSCAPE
SCHOOL. BY A. L,
BALDRY.

One of the chief glories
of the art of this country
B is, beyond question, the

EL school of landscape paint-

ag»g Wk, 401 ">' v ' .•' ,;- "'^mSSni^^mimmemmm^^Mk ing which flourished during

the earlier years of the pre-

■k T!$ sent century. The record

^ ,' of the achievements of the

Wk jgjfrfa group of artists who, break-

Bfeb. JfemK^B ing away from the older

traditions and conventions,

Bk/'!^ % rm Wk. set themselves to paint

Nature not by rule but

■k. >^B^ • m devotedly and with sincere

KRH Wbm^ ■ respect, is an extremely

IkJV notable one in every way.

It shows us a remarkable
series of great painters,
■ ^Bf'I^^B keen observers and careful

HHH Ej-lU^TfcR- •• ■ ' students, whose one aim

mtltk tKT .^&titHK& M was always to reflect in

|j B tjfl telligently what they saw,

M regarding Nature as an

| . ^ infallible teacher whose

i ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^h^^^^H^^^H^n^ --smmd: -iM^j precepts were worthy of

acceptance without hesita-

THE LATE GEORGE CHESTER FROM A PHOTOGRAPH tjon Qr question. By their

I oo
loading ...