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Studio: international art — 12.1898

Seite: 247
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1898/0295
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
facsimile
Some Old Wrought-iron Work

ENTRANCE GATE TO DRIVE AT BOWDEN GREEN

where they can be inspected, permanent washstands
with hot and cold supply in each bedroom, waste
pipes that cannot become channels for noxious
gases—all these and a hundred other things ought
to be the commonplaces of good architecture;
for they are its true essentials. Having seen that
all these are provided it is an additional satisfac-
tion to discover that a house is not less beautiful
because it is practical. The charm of Mr. Arnold
Mitchell's work is evident to a chance visitor;
therefore, in place of criticism or eulogy, it may
be left here to speak for itself through the excel-
lent photographs taken especially for this article.
A plan of each floor would have revealed excellent
lighting and novel as well as satisfactory arrange-
ments for ventilation ; but plans are not easily read
by the average person; at least such a conclusion is
forced upon one by the evidence of indifference
displayed, even by those about to build, to this
most important detail of house-construction. Yet
as working drawings are not included, and the
mere prosaic qualities of a house are not to be
discovered from pictures, it seemed best, "once
and for once only," even at the risk of departing
from the usual habit of The Studio, to place them

in evidence in the text, reserving consideration of
Mr. Mitchell's artistic treatment of homes to a more
convenient season.

OME OLD WROUGHT-IRON
WORK. BY EDWARD F.
STRANGE. WITH DRAW-
INGS BY HERBERT S. PEP-

PER.

The period which was inaugurated by the reign
of William and Mary has much to answer for in
English art, both of good and evil. It left us
a legacy of a quaint, narrow-waisted, high-heeled
sort of sentiment, which even yet is not entirely
exhausted. It is responsible for the invention of
tea-drinking, for the first publication of society
scandals, for the building of houses in rows to
sample, and the laying out of parks and gardens on
strictly mathematical lines. Still, looking back on
the prettiness and unconscious humour of the life
of that age, we somehow or other cleave to what
remains to us thereof, and absolutely decline to, as
Hans Breitmann puts it, " undutchify ourselves"
any more. And of these relics, the most English

FOWL-HOUSE AT BOWDEN GREEN

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