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Studio: international art — 15.1899

Seite: 98
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1899/0119
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0.5
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facsimile
Arras Tapestries at Stanmore Hall

MUSIC-COVER FOR " VIEILLES CHANSONS DE FRANCE " (GUINZARD AND CO.) BY GEORGES AURIOL

music itself—the page on which it is scored—that
should be decorated, although not perhaps in the
regular preconceived manner adopted in book illus-
tration. The Middle Ages which have bequeathed
to us the perfect and final example of all that
human imagination can produce in the way of
applied art, found in their antiphonaries a means of
illustrating music by a special employment of orna-
mentation. The principle seems excellent, and I
cannot see why M. Georges Auriol, who is par-
ticularly equipped for the task, should not endeavour
to revive it in the light of modern requirements.
Until such time as the illustration of music does
not go hand-in-hand with music itself—and I do
not disguise the fact that the combination is full of
dangers—it will be nothing but a vain imagery,
however exquisite and expressive and original
may be the work of the various draughtsmen and
artists.

In view of the wide interest aroused in the
methods of Japanese wood-carvers by the pub-
lication in The Studio (Vol. V;) of the articles
dealing with the subject, it has been decided to re-
issue the series in handbook form, with additional
text and illustrations.
98

T

HE ARRAS TAPESTRIES OF
THE SAN GRAAL AT STAN-
MORE HALL

Twice before examples of the now
famous arras tapestry made after designs by Sir
Edward Burne-Jones for Stanmore Hall, have
been pictured in The Studio. The first time in
connection with an article on Artistic Houses
(September 1893); the second (July 1894) as
illustrations to an interview with William Morris,
on the revival of Tapestry Weaving. But at
neither date was the series so complete that the
whole scheme could be brought together for the
interest of those who are debarred from seeing the
originals.

Now, thanks to the courtesy of Mr. DArcy, the
owner of the beautiful house wherein these notable
examples of a revived craft do duty as decoration
of the dining-room, some of the completed tapestries
and many of the preliminary cartoons for the series
have been seen at the Arts and Crafts Exhibition.
We find that the original designs by the late Sir
Edward Burne-Jones " are not above fifteen inches
high," and that beyond slight indications of colour
they are merely elaborate and carefully drawn
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