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Studio: international art — 17.1899

Seite: 39
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1899b/0054
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American and French Applied Art

GOLD FISH AND FLOWERS DESIGN FOR STAINED GLASS BY LOUIS C. TIFFANY

(Copyright of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, New York)

American and french

APPLIED ART AT THE
GRAFTON GALLERIES. BY
HORACE TOWNSEND.

Among the many art exhibitions
which have been put before Londoners this season
the historian of the future, to use a hackneyed
phrase, will probably find that among those which
chiefly claim his attention,
not alone for their intrin-
sic interest but for their
influence upon contem-
porary art, that which Mr.

S. Bing, of Paris, has
gathered together at the
Grafton Galleries will hold
a distinguished place.

Principally it concerns
itself with so-called Favrile
glass, and the stained-glass
windows which have been
brought from London
from the studio of Mr.

Louis C. Tiffany, of New
York. We have heard
much in past years of what
may almost be called this
new art of Mr. Tiffany’s;
and indeed not very long
ago The Studio itself
published an elaborately “egg-plant” window

illustrated and very com-
prehensive article upon
the subject of this blown
glass ware which has so
attracted the attention of
European connoisseurs
that in many of the
museums in Europe, in-
cluding South Kensing-
ton Museum and the
Luxembourg, small
collections have been
gathered together as
object lessons for the
local craftsmen. But
never before has so ex-
tensive an exhibit as this
been made, Mr. Tiffany
having stripped his
studios and store houses
bare in order the more
fully and thoroughly to
represent himself in Eng-
lish eyes. As is generally known, Mr. Tiffany was
led to undertake the manufacture of glass by the
difficulty he found in obtaining exactly what he
wanted from the manufacturers in order to carry
out his own designs of stained-glass windows, and
so forth. He began with a small furnace in his
studio; he has ended by extensive glass works at
Corona, Long Island. A walk through the Grafton

DESIGNED BY LOUIS C. TIFFANY

39
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