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Studio: international art — 17.1899

Seite: 232
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1899b/0263
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Modern German Lithography

Modern german litho-
graphy. III.—HAMBURG,
DUSSELDORF, AND
F RANK F ORT-ON-THE-
M AIN. BY HANS W. SINGER.

During the first half of our century quite a
strong interest seems to have been taken in art at
Hamburg, and not a little that compares favourably
with what was produced elsewhere saw the light of
day there. In the course of time, however, busi-
ness interests engrossed the city completely, and at
the end of the period which saw Hamburg rise to
be the principal commercial town of the Empire, the
love and practice of art had sunk to a very low ebb.
This has all changed now, and the event is a most
unusual one, for it may be said to be due to the efforts
of a single man—and he not an artist.

He is the director of the Municipal Fine Art
Museum, who, after providing in quite an unparal-
leled manner for the improvement and increase of

the museum under his own care, directed his
energies towards improving the conditions beyond
the walls of his own institution. He began by un-
earthing old Hamburg art, and created a great deal
of patriotic interest for former local artists, who,
though perhaps not quite the men of genius that
he proclaims them, are nevertheless well worthy of
more attention than they have received. Then he
advocated the labour of the amateur, and formed
and furthered a large club of dilettante art workers.
Even the best amateur is not altogether incapable
of doing harm, but there is always one thing that
commends him—his enthusiasm; and a few persons
enthusiastic about art can stir up a whole stagnant
community.

The director referred to also gave his support to
amateur photography, and finally he stepped in
medias res, by vigorously opposing an old academic,
tyrannical set of painters who reigned supreme,
and called forth a new school of younger talent.

From the very beginning these young artists came
into contact with lithography, and the poster for

THE PLOUGHMAN ’

232

FROM A LITHOGRAPH BY A. SIEBELIST
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