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Studio: international art — 19.1900

Seite: 38
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1900a/0051
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
0.5
1 cm
facsimile
A Dutch Etcher

In a general consideration of the plan it must be
borne in mind that it is designed under distinct
restrictions as to expenditure. It is in no sense a
" fancy " house, but represents a serious attempt
to meet the requirements of those who wish to
escape from the thraldom of suburban existence,
and for whom "eligible freehold residences" have
no charms. The average man, it is true, does not
ask as yet for other than these, and he would no
more recognise the unconventionally planned house
than he would set out to catch his morning train
without his regulation garb and paper.

In an age which caters to the vulgar, which
plays to the gallery in all its performances, which
floods him with cheap and trashy periodicals,
tickles his ear with popular music, and when every
possible variety of quack is supported by an eager
mob of willing dupes, the poor man who happens
to have achieved some cultivation, some love for
the beautiful in his surroundings, finds himself
severely alone. In despair, he has to live in some "at the door of a mosque"

villa built by ignorance for the ignorant, and he from an etching by m.

breaks his heart in vain attempts to cloak its horrors.

And so one still has hopes that
amongst the thousands of those who-
dwell in the suburbs there are at
least a few who have suffered much
from their surroundings, and it is to
such one looks for sympathy, with
ideas much at variance with those of
the average modern mind as ex-
pressed in the houses of to-day.

M; H. B. S.

A

DUTCH ETCHER:
M. BAUER. BY
ARTHUR TOMSON.

Mr. Bauer is a Dutchman Dutch
by birth, training, and in his art
to the very backbone a Dutchman.
He received his artistic education
at the Hague; and from the first he
has in divers ways qualified himself
for what is the work of his life. He
would show us the Orient as we
who love our "Arabian Nights" wish
to see it portrayed, and that he has
certainly done. All the sentiment,
the feeling of expectancy aroused
by those wonderful stories is con-
"in the bazaar" from an etciiin<: by m. BAUi-r veyed to us in his pictures. When.

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