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Studio: international art — 23.1901

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http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1901b/0028
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Recent Etching and Engraving

employed to impress us with these ideas and
these emotions.

M. Raffaelli has been curious enough to try
every process, and one may say without exaggera-
tion that he has succeeded equally in all. Many
are the sketches from nature, illustrative of Parisian
life and manners, he has published in the papers
and magazines, notably the " Revue Illustree" ;
while the volume entitled " Types de Paris,"
issued by the firm of Plon & Nourrit, affords
permanent proof of his lively imagination and his
suppleness of drawing, whether with pen or pencil.
He is an etcher too, as we may discover in the
keen and characteristic plates illustrating J. K.
Huysmans' " Croquis Parisiens" and the Gon-
court's " Germinie Lacerteux."

Not yet have we reached the end of M. Raffaelli's
achievements. He is a sculptor of uncommon
ability. In 1890, at Boussod & Valadon's, Boule-
vard Montmartre, he exhibited a curious series of
low-relief work in bronze, which made a great
impression—at least on me, if not on the world
at large.

Such is the work of M. Jean-Francois Raffaelli—
work of infinite variety and yet of great unity.
" A brain like his," justly remarks M. Roger Marx,

" aims not at one mark only, one invariable object;
he is ever aspiring to discover the unknown ; evolu-
tion and progress are his watchwords !"

Gabriel Mourey.

ECENT ETCHING AND EN-
GRAVING. BY FREDERICK
WEDMORE.

On the Spring Exhibition of the Royal Painter
Etchers it is well, I think, to found the few things
that I here wish to say. I have no intention of
writing in The Studio a notice of that exhibition.
That is not the point. The time is too late ; the
occasion does not demand it. Therefore two score
of prints quite worthy to be mentioned, were I
writing such a notice, will go unnamed in
this article. I shall name, it may be, but a
dozen; but I take the Painter Etchers as the
foundation of the business, in part because of that
Society's representative character. It has had
faults this year, but it does really represent the
range of Original Engraving—at all events, in
modern practice. One or two Englishmen of note
are absent. That need not prevent my referring to
them. Two or three of the most notable of living

BY CHARLES HOLROYD
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