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Studio: international art — 27.1903

Seite: 110
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1903/0122
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
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John Lavery

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DINING-ROOM WINDOW DESIGNED BY J. GAFF GILLESPIE

EXECUTED BY OSCAR PATERSON

work dominated by an intuitive sense of proportion
and colour and balance. -yy

ACOSMOPOLITAN PAINTER :
JOHN LAVERY. BY JAMES
STANLEY LITTLE.—PART II.

It is, of course, quite in the nature of things, and
entirely as it should be, that in the days of our
artistic adolescence, whether we be painters or
amateurs, a certain intolerance of shibboleths and
traditions should tincture the reverence we share
with our elders for the achievements of the old
masters. It is impossible for young men, filled
with the desire to accomplish something fresh and
original, to accept unmurmuringly the cut-and-dried
verdicts as to their predecessors, handed down to
them from the dim and distant past. Such verdicts
commonly provoke the young and lusty to vigorous
dissent. The youthful painter worth his salt
imagines that he and his associates have made
some fresh discovery, which places him and the
"school" to which he is affiliated, in quite a differ-
no

ent, and obviously to his mind superior, position to
that occupied by those old fogeys who muddled
along in the dark ages of art. In any case this
attitude was exceedingly common when Lavery's
art was in its infancy. The studios rang with the
" discovery" that in nature no such thing as a
brown shadow and no such thing as an outline were
to be found. The arrogance of the young men
of those days was never chastened by the reflection,
that in their knowledge of the science of pigments
and of their enduring properties the masters of the
Italian and Dutch Schools had much, had indeed
in most cases everything, to teach them. The sad
fate of some of Turner's masterpieces has in recent
years taught modern painters that it will not do, if
posterity is to be richer for their labours, to view
this essential matter, the knowledge of the proper-
ties of pigments, with careless indifference. It is
important that the painter should be something of
a chemist. The science of colours, set forth as
it was in the Middle Ages by many students and
experts, of whom Cennino Cennini may be taken
as a type, was not a closed book to the Italians and
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