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Studio: international art — 29.1903

Seite: 144
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1903b/0159
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
0.5
1 cm
facsimile
American Indian Basket-Work

M. DE ZOGHEB'S HOUSE AT CAIRO HERZ BEY AND BATTIGELLI BROTHERS, ARCHITECTS

Robertson and Moffatt. A lion executed in silk
embroidery attracts attention for its powerful pre-
sentation and clear, lustrous colour; and executed
in the same medium is a fine screen of birds framed
in carved Japanese teak. Some beautiful cloisonne
enamel work shows the possibilities in this direction,
as also does a handsome cabinet of original design,
finely carved, and surmounted with the ubiquitous
dragon. But the tour de force of the collection is
an exquisite group, a few inches high and as many
round, depicting a bag of grain which some mice have
invaded. The ensemble and detail are alike of a
kind which defies criticism, and shows the wonder-
ful resource and invention of the Japanese designer.
Verily, if genius be an "infinite capacity for taking
pains," this small ivory carving demonstrates it very
forcibly. It is impossible to speak too highly of the
value of this important exhibition. J. S.

We have been asked to state that J. S. Cotman's
painting, The South Gate, Yarmouth, belonging to
Mr. Arthur Samuel, is dated 1812, and not 1810, as
given in "Masters of English Landscape-Painting."
144

ETTER TO THE EDITOR ON
THE SUBJECT OF AMERICAN
INDIAN BASKET-WORK.

Dear Sir,—The value of a full and correct
understanding of the details relating to the origin
of ornament is so great that, perhaps, I need not
apologise for addressing a few lines to you upon
North American Indian baskets—objects which
are remarkable for the variety of pattern-work
displayed upon them and for their general decora-
tive value. In America native-made baskets are
greatly treasured, and fabulous prices are some-
times paid for examples displaying remarkable
quality of workmanship. As much as fifteen
hundred dollars have been asked for a single
example of surpassing excellence. But the point
upon which I wish especially to say a few words is
the symbolism displayed in the ornamentation of
these articles. As is generally known, the tribal
languages in America are somewhat limited in
their vocabulary, and symbolism becomes a
necessity of intercourse. Marks and signs of
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