Hinweis: Ihre bisherige Sitzung ist abgelaufen. Sie arbeiten in einer neuen Sitzung weiter.

Studio: international art — 35.1905

Seite: 12
DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1905b/0030
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
0.5
1 cm
facsimile
A German Architect

same thing every day, does not follow the fashion
to any extent, is quite untrimmed, no picture hat,
however large her face. She is never spotted, or
striped, or flowered, or even speckled, in her plain,
dark cloak.

Speckled materials, such as tweed, may be ser-
viceable for town wear; but is it kind to others to
add to the general greyness and griminess by
spending our lives in such neutral-coloured raiment?
Surely deep indigo blue, darkest green, dark brown,
and dark dusky purple would be suitable for the
darkest winter day and the muddiest street, and
yet they would relieve the general greyness, and
give a sober richness.

What are we waiting for? We have only one
life to live. Are we to go on having beautiful
houses, furniture, and patterned decorations, and
be ourselves the only blot on a harmonious whole ?

Let each one of us consider what is the most
useful and appropriate costume in which to work ;
let us have it well made by ourselves or others, not
following exaggerations of fashion, and with no
imitation ornament of any kind upon it. Let us
design quite a different dress in which to play, and
not wear tawdry worn-out finery on working-days.

Let us, if we pretend
to believe in art at all, try
to practise it consistently
in our lives, not only in
the one small detail which
may be our own craft.

Why can we not give our
decorative painters fresh
subjects for their com-
positions, so that we may
get something better than
fourteenth - century and
classical resurrections ?

We are asked to men-
tion that the two designs
by Mr. Walter Crane,
given in the account of the
Leeds Arts and Crafts Ex-
hibition in the January
number, are the property
of Messrs. F. W. H.

Fletcher & Co.; and that
the Wall Hanging in Appli-
que, designed with decora-
tive birds, which was illus-
trated in the April number,
is by Miss Mattis Hahr, and
not Miss Clary Hahr.

A GERMAN ARCHITECT: PROF.
EMANUEL SEIDL. BY MORIZ
OTTO, BARON LASSAR.

Among that small group of artist-s whose achieve-
ments have made Munich famous, the name of
Professor Emanuel Seidl ranks as one of the
first. We cannot here give a comprehensive
account of his work, but must restrict ourselves to
one or two conspicuous examples showing his
salient characteristics.

One such example is furnished by the recently
completed Heinemann Gallery in Munich, pro-
bably the finest private gallery in Germany. Its
noble exterior and the delicate beauty of the
arrangement and structure of the interior are proof
of Seidl’s ability to design work of a monumental
character.

It is, however, in the sphere of domestic
architecture that Seidl has been most successful.
His country houses, mansions, hunting lodges, and
so forth, are among Germany’s most cherished
artistic possessions, and his style and methods
have had an important effect on the type of
residential architecture.

STREET FACADE OF THE HOUSE OF EMANUEL SEIDL, ARCHITECT

MR. KARL BEMBE AT MAINZ
loading ...