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Studio: international art — 36.1906

Seite: 254
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http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1906/0272
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0.5
1 cm
facsimile
Studio- Talk

in those which have won for her such high
honours in France. The work of a true artist
reveals his ideals, the richness or poverty of his
nature. In that of Miss Nourse is shown the
broad human sympathy of a strong woman, who
believes in art not alone for art’s sake, but also
for the sake of a humanity which it can uplift and
spiritualise. A. S. Schmidt.

Technical hints from the

DRAWINGS OF PAST MAS-
TERS OF PAINTING. II. A.
WATTEAU.

The charming drawing illustrated herewith
in facsimile, after the original
by Antoine Watteau in the
British Museum, is worthy of
close attention by the student.

Upon a careful examination
of the original, evidence will be
found from which one may draw
the conclusion that the main out-
lines were first sketched in with
charcoal. The red and black
chalk lines were then added with
a firm touch, and the charcoal
dusted off, touches of white being
added finally.

The treatment of a figure
seated upon the ground is always
a little difficult, the pose itself
being by no means an easy one
to assume with grace. All awk-
wardness, more or less inherent
in the position, is overcome by
the artist in his treatment of the
right arm, which, while giving
the necessary support to the
body, is posed with an apparent
absence of effort or strain. The
original drawing is upon brown
paper, almost identically the
same shade as used in our repro-
duction. The brilliancy of effect
obtained by the simple means
employed is an excellent witness
ot the artistic power of the mas-
ter. The use of black and red
chalk in combination was greatly
in favour among artists in the
eighteenth century, but they were
rarely used with such success as
in the drawing here reproduced.

254

STUDIO-TALK

(From oui Own Correspondents)

LONDON.—Miss Jessie Bayes’ illumina-
tions revive in a fascinating manner an
art which in its higher forms has died
Early Tuscan and Florentine pictures-
and old French romances have been her inspiration:
through them and with her own sense of colour she
has passed 1o an understanding of the atmosphere
in which to create her designs. A visit to Florence
and Sienna gave a vivid impulse to her work. For
two years Miss Bayes worked in the engraving
house of Messrs. Walker & Cockerell, and this was
a considerable help to her drawing. Miss Bayes
was elected a member of the Miniature Society last

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ILLUMINATED PAGE

BY JESSIE BAYES-
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