Instytut Historii Sztuki <Posen> [Hrsg.]
Artium Quaestiones — 10.2000

Seite: 127
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/artium_quaestiones2000/0129
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TOTALITARIANISM AND MODERNISM: THE “THAW” AND INFORMEL PAINTING IN CENTRAL EUROPE

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4. Adam Marczynski, Kontrasty, 1957 [National Muséum in Krakow]

the otherwise uniform style of the socialist realism. No doubt, it was also
evidence of a spécifie attitude adopted with respect to modernity by the
Polish communist authorities.

The organizers of the Polish exposition adopted an assumption that in
Moscow they should show nothing but the modernist art, or at least that
they must not show the socialist realism like ail the other délégations.
That decision seems particularly important, no matter what was really
shown in Moscow by the Pôles, since when one takes a doser look at the
choice of exhibits, it turns out that the dominant was not modernism par
excellence, but post-impressionistic colorism and more expressive, or per-
haps more allusive, forms of realism. The sélection included some ab-
stract art interpreted as radical modernism (e. g., the works of Adam
Marczynski il. 4), but in fact abstraction was rather marginal. Still, in
the présent context it is significant that Marczynski’s art turned out the
most appealing to the Moscow audience. “The number of spectators in
the Polish section was so high, that on the second day of the exhibition
our Soviet assistant asked us for permission to put up protective ropes in
front of some exhibits, for example the paintings of Adam Marczynski,”
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