Papers of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens — 2.1883-1884

Seite: 295
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0.5
1 cm
facsimile
IN ASIA MINOR. 2Q5

frustes. Copie de M. Ramsay. See also Ephemeris
Epigraphica, 1884, /. 584, No. 1366.

C A I U A f-
M A X I M I A N 0
0 b I i C

CONIAkA
5 R TITVERVIT
R \NTONIVX
XX XX I V XX

ONEXXVC IEG
A \ G P R P R

P N B

This inscription I did not see, as my line of march did not lie
along the valley of the Sarus above Comana.

The new light thrown upon the history of Cataonia by my milliaria
makes it certain that this inscription must be divided into two, the
restoration of both of which being beyond question. I venture to
insert it here mainly in order to clear up the doubts and questions
raised by Mr. Waddington in the Bulletin as cited above.

The original inscription (A), remnants of which are lines 4-10,
stood in the name of the Philippi Augusti. Mr. Waddington points
out that in case the inscription belongs to Diocletian and Maximian
Augusti and Constantius and Maximian Caesares, as line 2 would
seem to indicate, then the title vir clarissimus legatus Augusti pro
praetore is historically inaccurate, inasmuch as from the times of
Diocletian on the province was governed only by a praeses or Co 11-
sularis. But my Nos. 290, 292, 294, 310, etc., make it perfectly
clear that the stone held two inscriptions, the oldest of which, being
in the name of the Philippi, might well enough give the governor the
title vir clarissimus legatus Augusti pro praetore. From the same
inscriptions it is clear that Mr. Widdin^ton's conjecture of Senecio as
the name of the legate is wrong, and that the name is Antonius Mem-
mius Hiero.
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