International studio — 36.1908/​1909(1909)

Page: 180
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/international_studio36/0275
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of ^4 Afh7-r777 and ^4 CaZw which is
really the Straits of Gibraltar with the Spanish
coast in the far distance. And in expressing this
view, that coiour is the ultimate expression of the
painter's personaiity, the artist referred me to
Franz Hais in his iatcst paintings of the Haariem
museum. He added that (as there) a painting
may, seen very close, seem confused, but at a
distance become clear and co-ordinate, and re-
duced for reproduction may give the appearance
of extreme finish ; whiie the painter has aiways to
remember that time itseif is to complete his work,
to aid in bringing it together.
Another of our reproductions may serve as an
admirable instance of the argument. EHa Davis
possesses great beauty of type, and, as 7%? dAzhf,
stands upright in cap, apron, and biack dress against
a background of the tabie
iaid for dinner. Nothing
could be broader and
stronger than the handiing
of this fuil-iength por-
trait, which from a dis-
tance, as noted above,
appears clear, co-ordinate
in design, and reserved in
colour. But this reserve
of colour, which was a
note of Mr. Lavery's earlier
art, is changing of late to
a greater richness. We
may trace this in those
studies of Morocco exhi-
bited this year in the
Goupil Gallery, and in the
briHiant portrait of this
summer of the lovely
blonde, Miss Lily Elsie, in
her rich costume of the
last Act of " The Merry
Widow."
A final word must be
reserved for our colour
reproduction, whose title,
^4 c/ a
7%/%?*^, points to the fact
that its original mys-
teriously disappeared from
a recent exhibition. In
this —a slender
blonde in walking dress,
with those delicate grada-
tions of grey and black of
which this artist is a master
180

—the inspiration of the Muse AWy7M73M seems
again to greet us. S. B.
A RCHITECTURAL GARDENING.
/\ —III. WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
/—AAFTER DESIGNS BY C. E.
^ *-MALLOWS, F.R.I.B.A., AND
F. L. GRIGGS.
TnE drawings published this month have nearly
all been produced under quite different conditions
to those which governed the illustrations to the
frrst two articles. In the latter the designs were
almost all made under certain given conditions or
within some particular restrictions and as solutions
of set problems in a modern architectural practice.
With two exceptions, that of the house at Happis-


A TERRACED FLOWER GARDEN

DEStGNED AND DRAWN BY F. L. GR]GGS
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