Pugin, Augustus Charles; Pugin, Augustus Welby Northmore; Willson, Edward J.; Walker, Thomas Larkins; Pugin, Augustus Charles [Editor]; Pugin, Augustus Welby Northmore [Editor]
Examples Of Gothic Architecture: Selected From Various Antient Edifices In England: Consisting Of Plans, Elevations, Sections, And Parts At Large ; ... Accompanied By Historical and Descriptive Accounts ... (Band 2): The history and Antiquities of the Manor House and Church at Great Chalfield, Wiltshire.. — London, 1839

Page: ci
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/pugin1839bd2/0247
License: Public Domain Mark Use / Order
0.5
1 cm
facsimile
THORNBURY CASTLE, GLOUCESTERSHIRE.

87

firmly set in the jambs, cannot be forced out of its place by the weigbt of tbe
window.

Plate XIII. Fire-place in Thornbury Castle.

This fire-place is taken from the middle room on the ground-floor, and
stands in tbe north wall. It bears a general resemblance to that displayed in
Plate VI., with some differences of detail. Tbe armorial badges, with wbich tbe
outer mouldings of tbe former cbimney are studded, are omitted in tbis; but
tbey are inserted in the panels over tbe mantel-piece. The first panel bears a
device used by King Edward III., and afterwards by Henry IV., Edward IV.,
&c., a white swan, witb its neck encircled by a crown, to which a gold chain is
appendant. The next bears a mantel witb cords and tassels dependant. On tbe
central panel tbe device appears to be the nave of a carriage-wheel, with flames
of fire issuing from it. The next has an escutcheon charged with the Staff’ord
knot.* On the fifth panel is a cognizance used by King Richard II., viz. a white
hart, collared and chained. All these badges are repeated on the chimney-piece
shewn in Plate VL, as well as on some of the door-cases and other parts of the
castle. The hearth is raised a little above the floor of the room, and is enclosed
by a ledge of stone, for preventing the fire from being spread about. The fuel
in general use at that time was wood, which did not require a grate.f

i Thornbury Castle.

Great Chamber ” and the “ Dining
aely elegant, being designed in strict
and decorated with the same cog-
wn on an enlarged scale. The same
with the Stafford knot placed on the
dsed above the floor, as is shewn in
icient buildings, with the intention of
'ere cut short at the bottom, to give
ich the floors used to be spread.

being composed of simple cords implicated in
i, Bourchier, and Wake, are the more ancient.”
Heraldry, 4to. 1793, p. 396.

;le, erected only a few years earlier than these
“ Pugin’s Specimens of Gothic Architecture,”
ice at Wells, engraved in the present work.

i

i

This cE_
Chamber,’E_
correspon<i_
nizances. E_
device is r=_
opposite s=-
the sectioiE-
keeping oe
room for tE"

* “ SomE"


a fantastic sf



c


co

—Dallaway’

= N

0

o

>

®

t Two \

E-

O

>

0

at Thornbur





vol. i., Plate

=-

Q)

c

CM

VOL. II

= LO


(D

®

>

®


=-

0

0

0


— •’t

oQ




E"

i—

c

i-


= co

3

(0

>

O

>

®


E-

O

0


= C\1

O









E-

O

®

3

® 1


-


CD

i. •


= E

— U
loading ...