Punch — 82.1882

Page: 251
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May 27, 1882.] PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI.

251

BALLAD BY A BETTING
MAN.

A.nothee year I ’ve lived to see
Once more a Derby Day;
Self-questioned, “ Is it well -witb
me ? ”

Can I make answer, “ Yea ” ?

Do I, with steadfast hope imprest,
Believe I ’m bound to win,

Feel eonscious of a mind at rest,
Experience peace within ?

Am I persuaded I have got
A sure and certain tip
From one who knoweth what is
what;

A seer who cannot slip ?

1 trust I ’ve made my book aright,
And cannot come to grief;

Else, peradventure, now I might
Turn over a new leaf.

Besides, I’ve hedged—the wary
course

Is oft the wiser plan ;

There ’s oft no getting at a horse :
No nobbling e’en a man.

But having reckoned all my bets,
The winner in the end,

On losers dubbmg up their debts
0 dear, may I depend ?

Them nought but Honour can
eompel,

The Law won’t force, to pay.
And shall I find that all is well
In sooth on Settling Day ?

Pl.EASAJtT Derby Sayings. To
an Owner.—“ I want to back
your horse, and will, if you will
tell me honestly and candidly
whether you intend him to try
to-day, or not.”

To a Trainer.—“I must con-
gratulate you on the appearance
of your animal; but really is it
true, what everybody is saying,
that you yourself gave him two
buekets of water before he came
into tbe paddock ? ”

PUNCH'S FANCY PORTRAITS.-No. 85.

MR. “BRUCE” RYMILL.

“ Going ! Going !.?

i

WAR TO THE KNIFE!

Ikeland has suffered from
many curses. She has suffered
from conquest; she has suffered
from famine. She has suffered
from agitators ; she has suffered
from rack-renters. Her melan-
choly history is written in many
strange ways and strange places.
The old hazard-table at the Eil-
dare Street Club—ploughed deep
with the furrows of human folly—
is one monument of her wretehed
past and more wretched present
Her life-blood has been drained
for the sustenance of gambler.-
and drunkards. She has been
governed by fools; she has been
governed by rogues ; and she is
now governed by thieves and cut-
throats. She has taken to the
knife. Her chosen patriots affect
to deplore this, though their
hands are morally as red as tht
hands of the Three Anabaptists
in the Prophete. She has taken
to the knife. No indignation
meetings — no protests — no Mr.
O’CrocO’Dile’s tears can get rid
of this shameful fact. She has
taken to the knife — whether
butcher or bowie is not yet cer-
tain—as, before this, she took to
the revolver.

“ Did you e’er have the luck to see
Donnybrook Fair ?

An Irishman ali in his glory is there f

With his Yankee revolver,

And knife up his sleeve! ”

Pleasant Derby Sayings. To
a JBacker.— u Well, yes, on paper
your book looks wonderfully
good, but I suppose you ’ve heard
that the man who laid you that
1000 to 30 four times is broke?
Write to me from Boulogne, old
Chappie.”

To a Jockey. — ‘ ‘ Hope that
bridle ’s strong, Laddie ; it would
be a bit awkward for you if it
broke opposite the Stand.”

Mr, Hamilton Aide here rose. He said he had not long since
entered himself at the College, desirous of taking his degree as Pan-
taloon. Yet he had been expelled. He considered sucli treatment as
a gross outrage. ( Uproar.) He repeated it. He had been uncere-
moniously “ rusticated.” (Laughter.) It was with a generous
impulse to swell the number of students, if only to the extent of one,
and so to enable the Institution to make a better show to the public
when walking out two and two, that he had enrolled himself for
instruction; though, he admitted, he had done so quite as an
amateur. (“ Oh ! ohJ”)

The Senior Warden (Mr. J. L. Toole) interposed. He said there
appeared to be some “most extraordinary” mistake. “ Rustication ”
merely meant a turn in the Provinces. (“ Hear, hear /”) He felt
sure no offence was meant to the honourable undergraduate, by
sending him down for his little go to Lyme Regis. Honours at
Drury Lane would come later. Perhaps. (Laughter.) The last
speaker should remember that whatever he had been once, he was
now a “professional.” (Cheers.)

The Rev. Mr. Bedlam said, that as a “ professional ” of very old
standing himself, he concurred heartily in what had fallen from the
worthy Warden. And he would like to put in a word here. It was
this. Amateurs were the bane of this question. (Applause.) What
did a set of dilettante meddlers know about the British Stage ?
Nothing! (Load cheers.)

Mr. Alfred Austin (with luarmth), I am entirely of your opinion,
Sir, (Loud lauahter.)

Mr. Corney Grain wanted to know whether any replies had been
received from the Foreign Governments who had been asked to
furnish full particulars as to the working of State aid and endow-
ment of the National Drama.

Lord Wharnclieee (with deep emotion). No, Mr. Grain. Iregret
to say—none ! (Loud laughter.)

Mr. Dion Boucicault here rose, and was about to give the noble
Chairman his cordial support, when one of the door-keepers an-
nounced, amidst indescribable confusion, that the brokers had effected
an entrance, and were already in possession of the premises. Upon
having this not altogether unexpected pieee of intelligence whis-
! pered to him by the Lord Mayor, who happened to have looked in
! at the Meeting casually in a quite friendly and unofficial manner,
the noble Chairman, who seemed to feel the painful position of the
Institution very keenly, after a few moments’ conversation with the
Council in a corner, withdrew hurriedly with the archives to consult
a solieitor, and the proceedmgs terminated.

“BEARING THE BELLP’

Great Paul. Another Jumbo—Pauley IIauley ! ”

Werk/Gegenstand/Objekt

Titel

Titel/Objekt
Punch's Fancy Portraits.- No. 85; Bearing the Bell
Weitere Titel/Paralleltitel
Punch
Quelle des Titels
Sachbegriff/Objekttyp
Grafik

Inschrift/Wasserzeichen

Aufbewahrung/Standort

Aufbewahrungsort/Standort (GND)
Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg
Inv. Nr./Signatur
H 634-3 Folio

Objektbeschreibung

Objektbeschreibung
Bildunterschrift 1: Mr. "Bruce" Rymill. "Going! Going! ...?" Bildunterschrift 2: Great Paul. Another Jumbo - "Pauley Hauley!" Bourdon bell: Great Paul Bruce: Ein Pferd im Besitz von Herbert Rymill gewann Derby's um 1882.

Maß-/Formatangaben

Auflage/Druckzustand

Werktitel/Werkverzeichnis

Herstellung/Entstehung

Künstler/Urheber/Hersteller (GND)
Sambourne, Linley
Entstehungsdatum
um 1882
Entstehungsdatum (normiert)
1877 - 1887
Entstehungsort (GND)
London

Auftrag

Publikation

Fund/Ausgrabung

Provenienz

Restaurierung

Sammlung Eingang

Ausstellung

Bearbeitung/Umgestaltung

Thema/Bildinhalt

Thema/Bildinhalt (GND)
Satirische Zeitschrift
Karikatur
Rennpferd
Reiter
Glocke
Saint Paul's Cathedral <London>
Bruce <Pferd>

Literaturangabe

Rechte am Objekt

Aufnahmen/Reproduktionen

Künstler/Urheber (GND)
Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg
Creditline
Punch, 82.1882, May 27, 1882, S. 251 Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg
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