Studio: international art — 46.1909

Page: 120
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1909a/0142
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A rchitectural Gardening.—IV.

“lovers” BEGINNING OF CHING DYNASTY
(See previous article)

Architectural garden-
ing.— IV. WITH ILLUSTRA-
TIONS AFTER DESIGNS BY
C. E. MALLOWS, F.R.I.B.A.,
AND F. L. GRIGGS.

The unity in design of the house and garden
as a matter of plan has been touched upon in
the notes accompanying the preceding illustra-
tions, but very little, if any, reference has been
made to the equally important question of detail.
There should be evident in the design as a
whole the same coherent intention in detail as
in plan. A scheme which may be quite admir-
able in itself and satisfactory in its treatment
of both house and garden in general idea may
be seriously marred, if not altogether spoilt, by
want of thought not only in the design but in
the arrangement, in the scale, and in the char-
acter of the detail. The same watchful care of
the work is required from the designer in this
120

particular as in any other; it is, perhaps, as severe
a test of his powers of design, of his sense of pro-
portion, of form and keenness of judgment and
delicate taste as could well be required of him.
The utmost care and patience are necessary at this
stage of the problem, for it is of the greatest im-
portance that the details of the garden architecture
should be in absolute sympathy and agreement
with those of the house itself and have that same
kind of intimate connection which is to be found
in a thoughtfully designed interior of a house and
all its decoration, even down to the details of the
furnishing.

To accomplish this end in garden design is no
easy matter, and can only be successful after much
patient experiment and comparison through the
medium of either perspective drawings for the
general scheme and models wherever it is possible
on the actual site. The latter will be found most
valuable in the arrangement or placing of the main
decorative features, such as lead figures, sundials,
balustrades, etc., the scale and proportion of which
should always be judged on the site and never left

A GARDEN ENTRANCE DESIGNED AND DRAWN BY C. E.
MALLOWS, F.R.I.B.A.
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