Studio: international art — 56.1912

Page: 298
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1912b/0320
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The National Competition of Schools of Art, igi2

DESIGN FOR BOOK ILLUSTRATION

HE NATIONAL COMPETITION
OF SCHOOLS OF ART, 1912.

Last year, in a circular issued by the Board
of Education, a reorganisation of the National Art
Competition was promised by a scheme that would
include a suitable place for showing the prize works
executed in the schools
controlled by the Board.

The scheme may be in
course of development, but
there are no signs at present
of changes in the methods
of the competition or of
the promised “suitable
place ” for displaying its
results. So far as the
National Art Competition
itself is concerned re-
organisation is not urgent.

On the present lines it is
a valuable feature of the
curriculum, and would
probably continue to be
so for some years to come
without much alteration.

More important for the
moment is the question of
the gallery in which the
works are shown. Protests
against the unfortunately
chosen place of exhibition
have been made in the
298

Press over and over again
without avail, but after the
Board of Education’s
circular it was hoped that
the present year would
witness the abandonment
of the sun-baked iron and
glass building in the waste
ground behind the Natural
History Museum that has
hitherto been considered
good enough for the prize
works in the competition.
But nothing was done, and
the chosen examples from
all the State-supported art
schools in England were
banished once more to the
backyard instead of being
shown, as they deserved,
in the Victoria and Albert
Museum. The National Art Competition has a
claim of long standing to space in the museum.
Two of its galleries, now devoted to other uses,
were, in fact, originally built for the express pur-
pose of displaying the competition works.

The examples of applied art exhibited last month
showed considerable advance in skill of hand but

BY WALTER F. V. ANSON (LEICESTER)

DESIGN FOR BOOK ILLUSTRATION

BY WALTER F. V. ANSON (LEICESTER)
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