Studio: international art — 60.1914

Page: 126
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1914/0148
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The Chdteau of Rosenborg

The chateau of rosen-

borg, COPENHAGEN, AND ITS
COLLECTIONS. BY GEORG
BROCHNER. (Second Article.)

In a former issue (July) I dealt with the chateau
itself and some of its very handsome apartments ; in
this and subsequent articles I now propose to render
some descriptive accounts of the manifold treasures
it contains, of which a number unquestionably are
entirely unique both as regards superb craftsmanship,

“KING CHARLES II.” BY PAUL PRIEUR, 1669

intrinsic beauty, and monetary value, from the
collector’s point of view. One simply marvels
at the subtle ingenuity, at the inventive powers, at
the incredible patience revealed in scores upon
scores of objects in this collection, and at the utter
disregard for costliness of material in which many
of the craftsmen of old were enabled to indulge.
Surely our own time can never attempt to vie with
past ages in this field of the crafts, from sheer lack
of sincerity in and reverence for the work, if for
no other reason. Moreover, a royal court was then
wont more than now to attract those most skilful
in the arts and crafts, and a number of the most
famous craftsmen are represented in the Rosenborg
collection.

This, as might be expected, also applies to the
charming art of miniature painting. Miniature
portraits always have been, and for the matter
of that still are, exceedingly popular with royalty;
and it almost goes without saying that this royal
collection, by means of its unbroken growth through
126

three centuries, presents a singular and distinct
character, somewhat exclusive no doubt, but on
the other hand enhanced by class and historical as
well as pronounced artistic interest.

The miniatures which in course of time have
found their way to Rosenborg amount in number
to the very imposing aggregate of about five hun-
dred. Even if some of these may be deficient in
merit, the majority constitute a collection of un-
questionable international interest and importance
apart from their historical associations, and a
number of the world’s most famous miniature
painters during the last three hundred years will be
found represented among them. Unkind things are
nowadays often uttered and written about kings
and princes, but lovers of the beautiful in the arts,
and perhaps even more in the crafts, should feel
some gratitude towards these exalted personages,
for to them we are indebted for collections like the
one now under review.

A short survey of some of the more notable
amongst the miniature painters represented in the
Rosenborg collection may not be considered out of
place. I say collection, but as a matter of fact the
miniatures have not been looked upon or treated as
a distinct and definite collection; they have, more
or less, shared the fate of other Rosenborg treasures,
and have been arranged or kept in attachment to
other relics of the royal personages with whom
they, one way or another, were or had become
connected. No special heed appears to have been

“BARBARA VILLIERS, COUNTESS CASTLEMAINE,
AFTERWARDS DUCHESS OF CLEVELAND.” BY
PAUL PRIEUR, I669
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