Studio: international art — 89.1925

Page: 145
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1925/0151
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MR. F. E. OSBORNE'S CAST LEAD WORK

dally with in her idle moments. To those
unfamiliar with the atmosphere of the old
Shaivaite legends it is difficult to convey
the exquisite skill and profound imagina-
tion with which Tagore has condensed the
essence of his story within the space of a
few inches. A whole cycle of entrancing
and mysterious legends is concentrated in
a design of exquisite symbolism and re-
markable vividness. 000
It is said that the supreme significance
of the British connection in India is to help
modern India to recover the glories of
her ancient culture. In the sphere of art,
the sleeping Princess is opening her eyes
to the golden touch of British sympathy.
She appears to have sent a few of her
precious jewels to add to the lustre of the
Imperial crown. O. C. Gangoly.

[Our illustrations are reproduced by kind per-
mission of the Indian Art Committee.]

MR. F. E. OSBORNE'S CAST LEAD
WORK. a 0000

WHEN lying awake listening to the
dreary sound of the rain gurgling
down the waste-pipe, one's thoughts do not
readily turn to aesthetics, but rather to that
day's golf or tennis or walking, projected
for the morrow, of which the aforemen-
tioned dismal sound announces the weather
clerk's prohibition. In a perfectly poetical
world it would no doubt be a consolation
to think that the spouts which conducted
the offending moisture were works of art
fashioned by a skilled craftsman; but,

CAST LEAD RAIN-WATER SPOUT
HEAD. BY F. E. OSBORNE

CAST LEAD RAIN-WATER SPOUT
HEAD. BY F. E. OSBORNE

since the poetic mind is the possession of
a small minority, one must seek elsewhere
the source of the satisfaction which Mr.
F. E. Osborne's rain-water spout heads
undoubtedly give. It is not far to seek,
however, for is it not the true aesthete's
delight in seeing the most mundane things
made beautiful, with a beauty that com-
prehends utility in both the Benthamite
and the usual sense of the word, and in
feeling that every detail of a building has
been finished off with a view to its appear-
ance as well as its practicality i 0 0

A glance at any of our illustrations will
show how well Mr. Osborne has obeyed
the cardinal precept of applied art in
fitting the decorative motive to the par-
ticular material employed. He has used
simple geometrical ornaments with full
appreciation of the fact that lead does not
admit of finical minutiae, while his cen-
taurs, wheatsheaves, crabs, fish and buffa-
loes show how well he is able to adapt a
pictorial theme from nature to the purpose
of ornamentation. The gutters and garden
cisterns (one of which latter we illustrate)
give evidence of the same unerring taste
and the same realisation of the potentiali-
ties and limitations of lead as a medium. 0

Mr. Osborne's lead heads, gutters, etc.,
are cast as required on a prepared sand bed,

145
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