Studio: international art — 90.1925

Seite: 212
DOI Heft: DOI Artikel: DOI Artikel: DOI Seite: Zitierlink: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1925a/0218
Lizenz: Creative Commons - Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen Nutzung / Bestellung
0.5
1 cm
facsimile
" VIEW FROM NORDISKA MUSEUM
STOCKHOLM." WASH DRAWING
BY EINAR NERMAN

in London was " The Foolish Virgins/' of
the Swedish Ballet. The original sketches
for this ballet, which was also produced
in Paris and New York, were on view in
the exhibition. Another interesting item
was the collection of dolls and fancy
figures in painted woods, a 0 a

When circumstances permit him to
indulge his poetical or humorous inven-
tions, Nerman makes a special appeal as
a designer for print. The exhibition gave
us various examples of his versatility in
this respect. From children's books and
nurseryrhymes to music-covers and posters,
every form of print-work was represented.
The number of posters from Sweden,
whichwere exhibited, testified that Nerman
possesses just the touch which should
make his poster-work pre-eminent. They
catch the eye—that is essential; and,
having caught the eye, they please—a
scarcely less essential quality. A few
posters of Nerman's have appeared here in
London, chiefly for theatrical productions,
also one, depicting the Town Hall of
Stockholm for the Swedish Travel Bureau,
and we should like to see more. 0 a

212

THE ART OF ISABEL CODRING-
TON. a 0 0 0 0 0

NONE of the professions is now closed
to women—though in few of them
have they dominated ; but in the realms
of art the progress has probably been more
marked than in any other sphere—and in
the forefront of the movement must
certainly be ranked the work of Isabel
Codrington—in private life Mrs. Mayer.

A well-known exhibitor at the Royal
Academy, where she is generally hung on
the line, her work is equally appreciated
at the Paris Salon, where her contribution
this year has attracted considerable atten-
tion ; indeed, like much of English merit,
she has been appreciated abroad far more
than at home, and her works are being
continually reproduced in foreign periodi-
cals. The reason is probably the smallness
of her output, and the fact that for years
she entirely gave up her art for family
duties. 000000
When she returned to it, however, she at
once bridged over the gulf that nowseparates
her from the Victorians. She had originally
come under the influence of Burne-Jones
and Rossetti and Millais—as some of her
earlier work shows clearly—but when she

"OLD LAND WORKER"
BY ISABEL CODRINGTON
loading ...