Studio: international art — 65.1915

Page: 122
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1915b/0142
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Recent Designs in Domestic Architecture

R

ECENT DESIGNS IN DOMESTIC
ARCHITECTURE.

The three houses by Messrs. Ashley and
Winton Newman illustrated in this issue represent
the practice of these architects (both of them Fellows
of the Institute) distinct from their larger work,
included in which may be mentioned the new
Council Offices and Art Gallery at Birmingham.

The first of the three—a house at Beaconsfield—
is an interesting example of decorative design in
architecture. The building is placed on a wooded
slope a short distance away from the town, and its
main features are apparent from the two perspec-
tives and the plan. The external walls are faced
with red bricks of varying
tints, relieved with patterns of
darker bricks in the gables
and chimney stack. The bay
windows facing the garden
were built with English oak
with brick fillings of herring-
bone pattern. Dark red,
hand-made tiles were used for
the roof. Whitewood joinery,
slightly stained and wax
polished, was used inside,
with a parquet floor in the
drawing-room. The staircase
is lighted by the large bay

window dominating the entrance front. The chief
bedroom is over the drawing-room, and on this floor
are three other bedrooms, a dressing-room, nursery,
two bathrooms, &c. An attic and boxroom are in
the roof.

The most important of the three houses by
Messrs. Ashley and Winton Newman, here illus-
trated, is “ East Weald,” Hampstead (p. 124), which
is situated at the southern end of Bishop’s Avenue,
a private road leading from Hampstead Lane to the
Great North Road. Though some of the land in
the neighbourhood is to be let for building pur-
poses the surroundings are rural and wooded,
affording pleasant vistas from the various rooms.
The house stands in its own ample grounds, with

;TRANCE FRONT

H. V.

ASHLEY AND WINTON NEWMAN, ARCHITECTS

HOUSE AT BEACONSFIELD :
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