Universitätsbibliothek HeidelbergUniversitätsbibliothek Heidelberg
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Peust, Carsten
Egyptian phonology: an introduction to the phonology of a dead language — Göttingen, 1999

DOI Page / Citation link: 
https://doi.org/10.11588/diglit.1167#0011
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5.9 Glides: Vowels or consonants?..........................................................................260

5.9.1 Principal pieces of evidence; 5.9.2 Scholarly opinions; 5.9.3 The borderline
between glides and vowels in Pre-Coptic times

5.10 Syllabic sonorants...............................................................................................263

5.10.1 General remarks; 5.10.2 Stressed syllabic sonorants before consonants and in
word-final position; 5.10.3 Stressed syllabic sonorants before vowels; 5.10.4 Unstressed
syllabic sonorants before consonants and in word-final position; 5.10.5 Unstressed syl-
labic sonorants before vowels; 5.10.6 Syllabic sonorants and vowel length; 5.10.7 The
phonological status of syllabic sonorants in Coptic; 5.10.8 Emergence and loss of syl-
labic sonorants

6 Prosody...........................................................................................................................269

6.1 Word stress..........................................................................................................269

6.1.1 Stress and tone from a typological perspective; 6.1.2 Stress in Coptic: internal
evidence; 6.1.3 Stress in Coptic: evidence from Late Coptic and borrowings into Arab-
ic; 6.1.4 Stress marks in Coptic manuscripts; 6.1.5 How to determine the stress position

in a Coptic word; 6.1.6 Phonemic stress in Coptic?; 6.1.7 Stress in Pre-Coptic Egyptian

6.2 Compounds..........................................................................................................275

6.2.1 Coptic compounds with final stress...............................................................275

6.2.3 Compounds with non-final stress..................................................................277

6.2.2.1 Definition; 6.2.2.2 Examples; 6.2.2.3 The development of compounds
with non-final stress: previous interpretations; 6.2.2.4 The development of com-
pounds with non-final stress in the light of the revised syllable structure rules

6.3 Clitic placement and intonational units in Earlier Egyptian.........................284

6.4 Graphical reflexes of boundaries......................................................................285

6.4.1 Introduction...............................................................................................285

6.4.2 Large units (paragraphs, sentences) in Egyptian.............................................286

6.4.3 Large units (paragraphs, sentences) in Coptic................................................286

6.4.4 Intermediate units (phrases, words) in Egyptian.............................................287

6.4.5 Intermediate units (phrases, words) in Coptic................................................287

6.4.6 Small units (morphemes, syllables) in Egyptian..............................................288

6.4.7 Small units (morphemes, syllables) in Coptic.................................................288

6.4.7.1 The influence of morpheme boundaries on Coptic spelling; 6.4.7.2
Syllable marking in a Sahidic text

6.5 Metrics.................................................................................................................292

Appendix 1 Frequency of consonants in Middle Egyptian.....................................295

Appendix 2 Consonantal compatibility in Middle Egyptian..................................297

Appendix 3 The Egyptian numerals from 3 to ±0 in cuneiform transcription.......3oo

Appendix 4 Word forms in Sinuhe still found in Coptic.........................................3oi

Appendix 5 Semitic loan words from the New Kingdom still found in Coptic.....307

Appendix 6 The Egyptian month names...................................................................3n

Appendix 7 Pronunciation of H in Late Coptic.......................................................3i2

Appendix 8 Representation of Coptic consonants in Arabic loan words..............32i

Appendix 9 Modern Egyptian toponyms of Pre-Arabic origin................................324

Appendix 10 Some lexical differences between two major Coptic dialects...........327

Selective index...................................................................................r..................................329

Topics; Egyptian and Coptic words; Egyptian proper names in cuneiform transcription;
Words in other languages; Hieroglyphs

Bibliography..........................................................................................................................335

Abbreviations of journals......................................................................................................363
 
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