Studio: international art — 39.1907

Page: 235
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Recent Designs in Domestic Architecture

I

his work—a gulf that had
been getting wider and
wider since the decay of
the Guild system, and
reached its worst form in
the early years of last
century. But about the
time when John Ruskin
was giving his vigorous
lectures upon architecture,
William Morris and Phillip
Webb had begun to create
an influence that inspired
and still inspires the best
domestic architecture of
our time. The emotional
impetus underlying all that
they accomplished brought

FIG. 27.—set OF show spoons with figures of saints, etc., carved and u ■ A

painted by styrian peasants about an examination and

(From Martin GerlacKs " Volkstiimliche Kunst") re-valuation of current

ideals in relation to art

RECENT DESIGNS IN DOMES- and craft, all the more remarkable as being in
TIC ARCHITECTURE. direct antagonism to the commercial and material

tendencies of the age.
In giving a few illustrations of Mr. "Among the leading ideas which influenced
Charles Spooner's designs for country dwellings these pioneers, perhaps the most important was
we append some notes written by Mr. G. LI. the great value they attached to the traditions
Morris on the principles by which the architect ot architecture—not traditions of style so much as
has been guided in his
work.

" To arrive," Mr. Morris
says, "at a just and criti-
cal appreciation of Mr.
Spooner's varied work, and
the relation it has to the
best artistic tradition of
to-day, it will be well
perhaps briefly to review
those ideas which have
helped to revolutionise
English domestic architec-
ture during the last forty-
five years. Behind their
material expression was the
passionate desire for a more
humane conception of life
and art, a desire to re-
affirm the view that the two
are intimately bound up
together. This desire, in
fact, marked the beginning
of a movement which
aimed to bridge the gulf
between the craftsman and hall of house at bury charles spooner, architect

235
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