Egypt Exploration Fund   [Hrsg.]
Archaeological report: comprising the work of the Egypt Exploration Fund and the progress of egyptology during the year ... — 1904-1905

Seite: 82
DOI Artikel: 10.11588/diglit.12055.8
DOI Seite: 10.11588/diglit.12055#0094
Zitierlink: i
http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/archaeological_report1904_1905/0094
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82

Peogbess of Egyptology.

papyrus literature, in so far as it concerns theological studies, to the
extra volume of Hastings's Dictionary.so

A very complete account of the latest Coptic publications has been put
together (in two parts) by Tukaief, who analyses each work.81 It is to
hoped that the list will appear periodically.

P. Boueiaxt publishes s~ a curious fragment from his father's papers.
It contains a list of the zodiacal signs, with the stay ofj the sun in each
and the dominant planets. The Arabic names of the latter are in Coptic
transcription. Coptic scholars would doubtless be grateful if further
papers from the same source were made accessible.

Two further articles by Leclerc<> contain material relating to Christian
Egypt : that on the word Amen and upon Amulet.53 The former gives
some new texts from funerary stelae.

A Sa'idic papyrus fragment with part of a recipe for preparation of
parchment is printed by Ci;om.s1

Digging at Tehneh (v. last Report 83), Lefebyee and Barry have
found a number of Sa'idic papyri and ostraca.84"

De Kicci's mission to Egypt during last winter produced a number of
Coptic fragments,1^ copies of which he has kindly allowed the present
writer to see. They contain biblical passages of some length and some
early magic texts. De K. and Winstedt intend to publish them.

A new work of Gayet's,sg describing visits to several of the principal
monasteries, contains imaginative pictures of the famous monks who dwelt
there. As usual, the religious heritage of the Copts from their pagan
ancestors is especially dwelt on. It may be observed that the identification
of Bir el-Ain, as the last shelter of the exiled Nestorius, seems to be based
merely upon the occurrence among graffiti there of that name among many
others (c. Becueil xi, 147).

Almost simultaneously with this Report will be issued the Catalogue of
the British Museum Coptic MSS., which has occupied the present writer
for much of the past ten years. It contains some 630 pages and describes
1252 MSS., with the texts or analyses of a large number of them.

The death, after much illness, in April 1905, of Jacob Kuall, deprives
us of an excellent Coptic scholar, whose loss is likely to come home to all
those interested in the publication of texts. Krall was in charge of the
Coptic portion of the great Bainer Collection, many texts from which, of
hitherto almost unknown types, he edited in the Mittheiluivjen and Corpus;
but a very large number are still unpublished. It is said indeed that
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