Howard, Frank
The sketcher's manual: or, the whole art of picture making reduced to the simplest principles by which amateurs may instruct themselves without the aid of a master — London, 1841

Page: 43
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/howard1841/0080
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CHAPTER IV.

STRONG AND WEAK POINTS OF A PICTURE.

If any proof be wanting of the neglect of the
art of making pictures, it will be found in the
deficiencies of technical language. There is no
name by which those points of light or dark,
introduced to give effect, can be described. It is
not my intention to invent any name for them, it
is sufficient for me that they are introduced with
great advantage, when in the proper places. And
what are, and how to find, the proper places, it
will be the purpose of this chapter to explain.

In the last chapter it was shewn, that the
principal subject of a drawing or picture should
occupy one or other side, and that these nameless
points for effect, whether animals or figures,
should not be in the centre. It may now be
more definitely stated that there are certain parts
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