Howard, Frank
The sketcher's manual: or, the whole art of picture making reduced to the simplest principles by which amateurs may instruct themselves without the aid of a master — London, 1841

Page: 71
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/howard1841/0110
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CHAPTER VI.

INSTRUCTIONS ON THE SELECTION OF SUBJECTS
FOR SKETCHING FROM NATURE.

In the foregoing chapters have been shown, the
principles upon which Pictorial Effects are
constructed, and by which the arrangement of
the subject must be regulated; also the features
necessary to be preserved to give the truth of
perspective. These are sufficient to enable the
amateur to produce pictures, either from imagi-
nation, which would be termed compositions:
from recollection of the scenes in nature; or from
sketches, however slight, made by themselves, or
by other persons.

Sketching from nature is a further advance,
which requires considerable practice before it can
be achieved with facility. One of the principal
difficulties, that of seeing objects under Pictorial
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