Instytut Historii Sztuki <Posen> [Editor]
Artium Quaestiones — 10.2000

Page: 77
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/artium_quaestiones2000/0079
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ANDREAS SCHLÜTER AND OTTO VAN VEEN: THE SOURCE, CONTEXT, AND ADAPTATION

77

figures from the Elisabethsaal in the Berlin Schloss (c.1700), and one of
the slave figures from the Equestrian Monument to the Great Elector
(c. 1702-04), as well as those from his Warsaw period works. Figures
from the court-façade tympanum relief hâve a marked resemblance to
the Berlin keystones and the Laocoôn in the characteristic features with
deeply set brows and expressive pathos. So does the surviving fragment
of a Chronos Head (Fig. 19) from the Palace’s garden-façade salvaged
from post-World War II ruins and now in the Warsaw City History
Muséum (Inv. Nr. 15648). Other Warsaw period works showing these
traits may support this premise as well.

21-22. Andréas Schlüter and Workshop. Dying Warriors, (1696). Arsenal, Berlin. (Pre-war
photographs)

An unusual wooden Crucifix, (Fig. 25) recently “re-discovered” in a
Polish private collection has a distinctively similar, and perhaps ”print-
inspired” physiognomy. If one can associate it with Schlüter’s circle
(c.1689 or before?),110 * * * then it may be a contemporary example of a classi-

110 Compare also the attributed wooden Crucifix at the Reformed Church at Wpgrôw

near Warsaw published by Karpowicz, “Andrzej Schlüter w Polsce,” pp. 192-193; Sztuka

Warszawy, pp. 79-81; Sztuka oswieconego sarmatyzmu, pp. 57-58; Kühn, “Schlüter als

Bildhauer,” pp. 116-118; and Peschken, “Beobachtungen zu Schlüter,” p. 66.
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